Hamlin TIMELINE

The history of The Hamlin School
11/27/1844 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Born
1859 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Graduates from Westford Academy at age 15
1860 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Block Island
1861 – Hannibal Hamlin Becomes 15th Vice President of the United States Under Abraham Lincoln
1863 – Governor Leland Stanford breaks ground to begin construction of the Central Pacific Railroad
1863 – Construction of the Cliff House begins
1863 – Battle of Gettysburg Fought
1863 – The Miel Institute is established
1863 – The tradition of Thanksgiving Day celebration is born
1867 – The Home Institute is established
1870 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Accepted to Michigan University
1874 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Graduates from University of Michigan
1875~1877 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Teaches at Detroit High School
1877 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Nevada
1879 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to San Francisco
1885 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Franklin Street
1885 – Van Ness Seminary Established
1886 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Van Ness Avenue
1888 -Century Club Founded
1889 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Teaches in India
1891 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Founds the SF AAUW
1893 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Tutors Alice B. Toklas
1889~1896 – Van Ness Seminary comes under the direction of Reverend Samuel H. Willey
1896 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Purchases Van Ness Seminary
1896 – The Century Club Social Day Breakfast
1896 – The First Women’s Intercollegiate Basketball Game Takes Place
1898 – School is Renamed Miss Hamlin’s School for Girls
1899 – First Epilogue is Published
1901 – James Leary Flood Builds Flood Mansion
1906 – 1906 Earthquake
1906 – Hamlin School relocates
1907 – Sarah Dix Hamlin moves Miss Hamlin’s to 2230 and 2234 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco
1915 – Sarah Dix Hamlin begins holding classes at 2119 and 2123 Broadway Street, San Francisco.
1923 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Death
1923 – Catherine (Kate) Hamlin, Sarah’s sister, owns and operates Miss Hamlin’s School for Girls.
1927 – Cornelia McKinne Stanwood becomes the new principal of the school
1928 – Hamlin School Moves to Current Location
1928 – Hamlin Athletic Association is organized
1929 – First Class Graduates from Present Site of School
1929 – Hamlin’s First Field Day
1933 – Construction of Golden Gate Bridge Begins
1937 – Students Carve the West Wall
1945 – Cornelia McKinne Stanwood Attends Inauguration of President Roosevelt
1958 – The school comes under the supervision of Miss Edith A. Mereen
1961 – The Hamlin School’s buildings become known as McKinne Hall and Stanwood Hall
1968 – Miss Colvert retires and Mrs. Ernest H. Wiener becomes principal
1968 – Miss. E. Louise Colvert becomes the Head of School
1970 – Jennie Mae Hooker Laboratory is built
1971 – The Hamlin School accepts boys
1979 – Mr. Donald Gordon becomes first male head of school
1984 – Virginia MacLean becomes Head of School
1997 – Ms. Arlene Hogan becomes Head of School
2007 – Mrs. Coreen Ruiz Hester becomes the tenth Head of School
2008 – Dr. Priscilla Winn Barlow serves as the Interim Head of School in the 2007-08 school year
2008 – Wanda M. Holland Greene becomes the eleventh Head of School
2011 – Harlem Globetrotters Visit Hamlin
2013 – Hamlin Celebrates the 40th Anniversary of Title IX

The history of The Hamlin School

2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the Hamlin School

Stanwood Hall

11/27/1844 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Born

Sarah Dix Hamlin was born in Westford, Massachusetts. Her house on Hildreth Street is known locally as Fletcher Tavern.

1859 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Graduates from Westford Academy at age 15

Founded in 1792, Westford Academy is one of the oldest public high schools in the United States.

1860 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Block Island

SDH moved to Block Island near Rhode Island to teach. Southeast Light, pictured here, sits on top of Mohegan Bluffs.

Southeast Light, Block Island

1861 – Hannibal Hamlin Becomes 15th Vice President of the United States Under Abraham Lincoln

Sarah Dix Hamlin’s uncle was a prominent opponent of the extension of slavery.

President Abraham Lincoln

1863 – Governor Leland Stanford breaks ground to begin construction of the Central Pacific Railroad

What later became know as the First Transcontinental Railroad was a 1,907-mile contiguous railroad line constructed between 1863 and 1869 across the western United States to connect the Pacific coast at San Francisco Bay with the existing Eastern U.S. rail network at Council Bluffs, Iowa, on the Missouri River.

Leland Stanford

1863 – Construction of the Cliff House begins

The first Cliff House was a modest structure built in 1863 by Senator John Buckley and C. C. Butler. Captain Junius Foster eventually leased the Cliff House Restaurant from C. C. Butler and under his management wealthy San Franciscans flocked to the coast to enjoy the unique restaurant and wonderful views. The guest register bore the names of three U.S. presidents as well as prominent San Francisco families such as the Hearsts, Stanfords, and Crockers, who would drive their carriages out to Ocean Beach for horse racing and recreation.

The Cliff House in San Francisco

1863 – Battle of Gettysburg Fought

The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania between Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war’s turning point. Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade’s Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee’s invasion of the North. Source: Wikipedia.org

A scene from the siege of Vicksburg from Harper’s Weekly, July 25, 1863.

1863 – The Miel Institute is established

A precursor to the Van Ness Seminary, The Miel Institute was San Francisco’s first Kindergarten.

The Miel Institute

1863 – The tradition of Thanksgiving Day celebration is born

It has been an annual tradition since 1863, when, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”, to be celebrated on Thursday, November 26.

The Chicago Tribune prints President Abraham Lincoln’s declaration of the last Thursday in November 1863 “as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens.”

1867 – The Home Institute is established

The Home Institute is the second precursor to the Van Ness Seminary.

The Home Institute

1870 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Accepted to Michigan University

SDH was one of first female students accepted to Michigan University. Michigan and a handful of other schools launched what was called a “dangerous experiment” — the “coeducation” of women and men in 1870.

Sarah Dix Hamlin’s graduating class at University of Michigan. SDH is standing in the back row, second woman from the right.

1874 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Graduates from University of Michigan

At the age of 30, Sarah Dix Hamlin was one of the first dozen women to graduate from the University

Sarah Dix Hamlin’s graduation photo

1875~1877 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Teaches at Detroit High School

Sarah Dix Hamlin Teaches at Detroit High School

Old Capitol and Detroit High School

1877 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Nevada

SDH works as a tutor for students in a mining camp near Cherry Creek, Nevada

1879 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to San Francisco

She lived at 810 Leavenworth and taught at an unspecified private school in San Francisco

1885 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Franklin Street

She moved to 1456 Franklin Street in San Francisco

1885 – Van Ness Seminary Established

1885, Van Ness Seminary Established.

1886 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Moves to Van Ness Avenue

1606 Van Ness Avenue in San Francisco

1888 -Century Club Founded

Sarah Dix Hamlin joins others to found The Century Club of California

The Century Club of California, 1355 Franklin Street in San Francisco

1889 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Teaches in India

She was sent by the Ramabai Association of America to help establish a school for child widows. Pandita Ramabai, pictured here, was the leading advocate for the education of women and girls in India.

Pandita Ramabai

1891 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Founds the SF AAUW

The San Francisco branch is the second oldest in the country.

1893 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Tutors Alice B. Toklas

An American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early 20th century, Toklas met Gertrude Stein in Paris on September 8, 1907, the day she arrived. Together they hosted a salon that attracted expatriate American writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, Paul Bowles, Thornton Wilder, and Sherwood Anderson, and avant-garde painters, including Picasso, Matisse, and Braque.

1889~1896 – Van Ness Seminary comes under the direction of Reverend Samuel H. Willey

At that time, an advertisement of the school, complete with a large picture, appeared in the classified section of the San Francisco telephone directory announcing “a boarding and day school offering superior advantages for pursuing both Common and Special Studies.” A distinguished educator, Dr. Willey was instrumental in helping to develop California’s educational system. He arrived in Monterey in 1849 and opened a school there. He played an important role in the establishment of Benicia’s Young Ladies’ Seminary, later to become Mills Seminary, and then Mills College. He was also one of the founders of the University of California, which, in his day, was the College of California in Oakland.

Samuel H. Willey

1896 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Purchases Van Ness Seminary

Sarah Dix Hamlin renames the school The Miss Hamlin’s School for Girls and Van Ness Seminary.

Article from the May 22, 1891 issue of the San Francisco Call

1896 – The Century Club Social Day Breakfast

Speakers included Sarah Dix Hamlin and Susan B. Anthony

Portrait of Susan B. Anthony

1896 – The First Women’s Intercollegiate Basketball Game Takes Place

The game was played at the Armory Hall in San Francisco between Stanford and Cal. Stanford won the contest 2-1.

1898 – School is Renamed Miss Hamlin’s School for Girls

1898, the school is renamed Miss Hamlin’s School for Girls.

1899 – First Epilogue is Published

The School’s first yearbook is published and given to students

1901 – James Leary Flood Builds Flood Mansion

The present-day site of The Hamlin School is an example of Italian Baroque Revival architecture.

1906 – 1906 Earthquake

The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 struck San Francisco and the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18, 1906. The resulting fires left about 3,000 people dead and over 80% of San Francisco destroyed.

San Francisco City Hall after the 1906 Earthquake.

 

1906 – Hamlin School relocates

Mr. and Mrs. Flood move into Stanwood Hall after fire gutted the Flood Mansion at 2222 Broadway. The School relocates to 2230 Pacific Avenue until 1927

1907 – Sarah Dix Hamlin moves Miss Hamlin’s to 2230 and 2234 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco

1907, Sarah Dix Hamlin moves Miss Hamlin’s to 2230 and 2234 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco.

1915 – Sarah Dix Hamlin begins holding classes at 2119 and 2123 Broadway Street, San Francisco.

1915, Sarah Dix Hamlin begins holding classes at 2119 and 2123 Broadway Street, San Francisco.

1923 – Sarah Dix Hamlin Death

Sarah Dix Hamlin’s headstone in Fairview Cemetary in Westford, MA

1923 – Catherine (Kate) Hamlin, Sarah’s sister, owns and operates Miss Hamlin’s School for Girls.

Mrs. Mert Thompson Kruger serves as Principal and Mrs. Mert Thompson Kruger serves as Principal.

1927 – Cornelia McKinne Stanwood becomes the new principal of the school

A close friend of Sarah Dix Hamlin, as well as a member of her faculty, Mrs. Stanwood bought one of the Flood mansions, which had been built by James L. Flood and later given by Miss Jennie Flood to the University of California. Under Mrs. Stanwood’s guidance, the Sarah Dix Hamlin School moved to its current site on Broadway and continued to develop its fine academic program. Its graduates went on to competitive colleges nationally. In 1947, Mrs. Stanwood retired after 19 years of devoted service.

Cornelia McKinne Stanwood

1928 – Hamlin School Moves to Current Location

2120 Broadway in San Francisco.

1928 – Hamlin Athletic Association is organized

From the 1929 edition of Epilogue

1929 – First Class Graduates from Present Site of School

June 1st, 1929, First Class Graduates from Present Site of School

1929 – Hamlin’s First Field Day

June 1st, 1929, Hamlin’s First Field Day

1933 – Construction of Golden Gate Bridge Begins

January 5th, 1933, Construction of Golden Gate Bridge Begins

1937 – Students Carve the West Wall

Behind 2120 Broadway

1945 – Cornelia McKinne Stanwood Attends Inauguration of President Roosevelt

Presidential Oath of Office administered to Franklin D. Roosevelt by the Honorable Harlan F. Stone, Chief Justice of the United States.

1958 – The school comes under the supervision of Miss Edith A. Mereen

In June 1957, the school was established as a nonprofit corporation, and a board of directors was formed. Miss Mereen retired on September 1, 1958.

Edith A. Mereen

1961 – The Hamlin School’s buildings become known as McKinne Hall and Stanwood Hall

In October of 1959 Miss Lila McKinne, sister of Mrs. Stanwood, generously deeded to the corporation the school property. Subsequently a new classroom building was constructed on Vallejo Street. At the dedication on September 6, 1961, it became known as McKinne Hall and the building at 2120 Broadway as Stanwood Hall.

 

1968 – Miss Colvert retires and Mrs. Ernest H. Wiener becomes principal

The boarding department was abolished and Stanwood Hall was now used for administrative offices and classrooms. Development of additional space permitted an expansion of the curriculum, particularly in the area of the fine and performing arts.

Mrs. Ernest H. Wiener

1968 – Miss. E. Louise Colvert becomes the Head of School

Miss Mereen’s successor was Miss E. Louise Colvert who had come from Milwaukee-Downer Seminary where she had served for a number of years, first as teacher of English, then as head of the English Department, and finally as academic dean.

E. Louise Colvert

1970 – Jennie Mae Hooker Laboratory is built

In the summer of 1970 the Jennie Mae Hooker Laboratory, housing science classrooms, was constructed in the area between Stanwood and McKinne Halls.

1971 – The Hamlin School accepts boys

In 1971, the Board of Directors added a new dimension to Hamlin with the decision to accept boys in the high school. Hamlin remained coeducational in grades 9-12 until the high school closed in 1975.

1979 – Mr. Donald Gordon becomes first male head of school

Upon Mrs. Wiener’s retirement, Mr. Donald Gordon became the first male head of school.

7Donald Gordon

1984 – Virginia MacLean becomes Head of School

Virginia MacLean, a graduate of Mills College, who had served as a teacher, assistant in admissions, and assistant to the principal, was named principal.

Virginia MacLean

1997 – Ms. Arlene Hogan becomes Head of School

A graduate of Brooklyn College and the University of Illinois, Ms. Hogan came to Hamlin from the Mary Institute in St. Louis, where she held administrative positions including assistant head of the upper school and head of the middle school. During her thirteen years as head of Hamlin, she also served as president of the California Association of Independent Schools and the National Coalition of Girls’ Schools. Under her leadership, Hamlin became a nationally recognized leader in girls’ education and constructed a new library, kindergarten rooms, gymnasium, and state-of-the-art technology and information center. Ms. Hogan completed her tenure in 1997.

Arlene Hogan

2007 – Mrs. Coreen Ruiz Hester becomes the tenth Head of School

Hamlin’s tenth head was Mrs. Coreen Ruiz Hester. During her ten-year tenure, the school completed a successful capital campaign, the largest in Hamlin’s history, which reconfigured the campus and brought the school into compliance with City ordinances for safety. In addition, the school expanded the footprint of the campus for the first time since 1927 by acquiring a lot adjacent to the school on Broadway and by receiving a donation of a house adjacent to the school on Vallejo Street. Along with other educational leaders in the community, Mrs. Hester was instrumental in the founding of the Bay Area Teacher Development Collaborative, a non-profit organization for the benefit of effective and strategic professional development for Bay Area teachers.

Coreen Ruiz Hester

2008 – Wanda M. Holland Greene becomes the eleventh Head of School

Wanda Holland Greene is a graduate of Columbia College, and received her Master of Arts degree in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching from Columbia University. Ms. Holland Greene was most recently the Assistant Head of The Park School in Brookline, Massachusetts, a pre-school through 9th grade co-ed day school. She joined The Park School in 1997 and served as Head of the Upper School for seven years and as the Acting Head of The Park School for six months, just prior to being promoted to Assistant Head of School in 2004.

2013 – Hamlin Celebrates the 40th Anniversary of Title IX

Guests included Brandi Chastain, Megan Delehanty, and Missy Park. “Our mission at Hamlin of developing extraordinary thinkers and innovators, courageous leaders, and women of integrity continues to have resonance in a world where many women continue to struggle for parity, self-sufficiency, physical safety, equal pay, access to education, and representation in government,” said Head of School Wanda M. Holland Greene. “It is our hope that Hamlin’s celebration of the 40th anniversary of Title IX will ignite a spark of activism in our girls so that they see themselves as participants in American history and young global citizens who can make a difference for girls and women around the world.”